Brad Miller

Splash Bowl, 1996
Stoneware
7” x 15” x 11”
Untitled, 2016
Stoneware
6” x 7.5”
Miller Rocks, 1987-2019
Ceramics
4.5” x 24” x 22”
Building, 2003
Stoneware
7.75” x 14” x 12”
Cube / Sphere, 1990
Stoneware
7” x 7” x 7”
Untitled, 1994
Stoneware
10” x 9” x 12”
Untitled, 1987
Stoneware
4” x 10” x 4.75”
Untitled, 1987
Stoneware
5” x 11” x 5”
Untitled, 1987
Stoneware
4.75” x 7.5” x 5”
Split, 1994
Stoneware, Acrylic
9.5” x 4.5” x 7.5”
History Series #2, 1984
Stoneware
14” x 11” x 10”
History Series #2, 1984 (detail)
Stoneware
14” x 11” x 10”
Handled, 1996
Stoneware, ceramic shards from various artists, mixed media
Dimensions variable
Handled, 1996
(detail)
Stoneware, ceramic shards from various artists, mixed
media
Dimensions variable
Untitled Grouping, 1994-2004
Stoneware
Dimensions variable
Untitled Grouping, 1994-2004
Stoneware
Dimensions variable
Untitled, 1989
Stoneware
10” x 5” x 5”
Insider, 1994
Stoneware
11” x 7” x 6”
Untitled, 1991
Stoneware
5” x 10.5” x 8”
Untitled, 2016
Stoneware
4.5” x 9.5” x 7”
Untitled, 2016
Stoneware
4.5” x 9.5” x 7”
Untitled, 2014
Stoneware
5” x 9.5” x 7.5”
Hole Bowl, 2002
Stoneware
4” x 15” x 15”
Hole Bowl, 2002 (detail)
Stoneware
4” x 15” x 15”
Installation view (New Work by Brad Miller and Mark Cesark)
Installation view (New Work by Brad Miller and Mark Cesark)
Installation view (New Work by Brad Miller and Mark Cesark)
#12, 2018
Porcelain
17.5” x 3.5”
#16, 2017
Porcelain
20.5” x 4”
#19, 2019
Porcelain
22” x 4”
#13, 2019
Porcelain
13” x 2”
#10, 2019
Porcelain
13” x 2”
#11, 2019
Porcelain
13” x 2”
#15, 2019
Porcelain
13” x 2”
#17, 2019
Porcelain
13” x 2”
#16, 2019
Porcelain
13” x 2”
Blacks, 2013
Porcelain
21” x 3.5”
#17, 2017
Porcelain
14” x 2.5”
#26, 2017
Porcelain
11” x 2”
#23, 2016
Porcelain
11” x 2”
#10, 2018
Earthenware
16” x 2.5
#8, 2014
Porcelain 12” x 2”
#5, 2017
Porcelain
12” x 2”
#1, 2017
Earthenware
14” x 2”

For availability and pricing please contact the gallery.

Exhibitions

Press

Biography

Miller was born in 1950 in Hillsboro, OR and received his MFA from the University of Oregon in 1977. He was the recipient of an NEA fellowship in 1992. He was the Director of the Ceramics Program at the Anderson Ranch Art Center in Snowmass, Colorado from 1980 to 1984, at that point he became the Executive Director of the program and held that position until 1992. His work is in numerous private and public collections including the Brooklyn Museum, New York; Arizona State University Museum of Art, Tempe; The Lannon Foundation, Los Angeles; National Museum of American Art, Washington D.C.; The Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.; and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California. Brad is currently based out of Southern California.

Constantly reconfiguring nature’s most persistent ordering systems is central to my work. Close packing, cracking, dendritic systems, and spirals are a few of these familiar images. When systems move between order and disorder, in the dynamic middle ground of changing pattern, I find my muses.

Artist Statement

Cella 7/15Seeing spontaneous patterns forming in the physical world has always captured my attention. With time it became apparent that a handful of these physical manifestations have, for thousands of years, been internalized and transformed into content laden symbols. One ever present example is the variations of the same stylized spirals. They are seen on a Mimbres pots, Celtic tombstones, Van Gogh’s Starry Night and a tattooed face of the Maori man. With today’s technologies we push the limits of seeing into and out to the edges of the universe. These new views continually confirm that many familiar patterns are found at all known scales of space and time.

In my work I keep reworking a handful of archetypal patterns including spirals, packing patterns, and dendritic systems. These patterns appear in different materials and processes sometimes incorporating several of these patterns in one piece. My intention is to permeate my work with these timeless and familiar patterns as they dance between order and chaos.